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Aurelio Corso
PostPosted: Tue Nov 17, 2020 8:51 am  Reply with quote



Joined: 08 May 2018
Posts: 73

Went out with 3 beautiful springers last weekend and was using a 16 with hammers.How do you guys carry I found it hard to cock both hammers when they flushed.
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Pine Creek/Dave
PostPosted: Tue Nov 17, 2020 8:57 am  Reply with quote



Joined: 17 Mar 2017
Posts: 1818
Location: Endless Mountains of Pa

Aurello Corso,

I was taught old school, it's very simple. You walk leaving the breech open with shells in it, and the Hammerscocked. When the dog goes on point you simply close the Breech and you are ready to fire the gun.

We have been doing this sense the invention of the Hammer gun, never had an accident of any kind, never had a misfire. It's safe and we kill lots of Birds in this manner.

Keep a close eye on your shells and have fun with your Hammer Gun.

Pine Creek/Dave
L.C. Smith Man


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Aurelio Corso
PostPosted: Tue Nov 17, 2020 3:24 pm  Reply with quote



Joined: 08 May 2018
Posts: 73

Thanks Dave
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simcgunner
PostPosted: Wed Nov 18, 2020 4:02 pm  Reply with quote



Joined: 25 Jan 2011
Posts: 70
Location: Virginia

I hunt with a German 16 GA. hammergun. I prefer to load the chambers and close the gun. I cock the hammers just before shooting. the reason I do this is I have lost shells out of the chamber when chasing woodcock and grouse in the thick stuff and an open gun. if the terrain is open I keep my gun open with both hammer and hammerless.
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Aurelio Corso
PostPosted: Thu Nov 19, 2020 7:52 am  Reply with quote



Joined: 08 May 2018
Posts: 73

So last week end while hunting in tall grass I did go down caught my foot in a downed fence I could not see and glad my sxs was closed.Interesting you keep your hammerless open is that because your safety makes your trigger inoperable but your hammers are still cocked.?
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Chicago
PostPosted: Thu Nov 19, 2020 10:49 am  Reply with quote
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Joined: 12 Aug 2007
Posts: 1285
Location: Northern Illinois

Aurelio,
Here is an interesting article about hammer guns that may be of some help.

https://www.shootinguk.co.uk/features/hammer-guns-an-introductory-guide-and-celebration-10057

Good Hunting,
Mike
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Aurelio Corso
PostPosted: Thu Nov 19, 2020 2:29 pm  Reply with quote



Joined: 08 May 2018
Posts: 73

Thanks for the great read I did learn something about non rebounding hammers.
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rjlance
PostPosted: Sat Jan 16, 2021 12:46 pm  Reply with quote



Joined: 19 May 2014
Posts: 137
Location: Massachusetts

Honestly. I don't think hammer guns are a good choice for hunting with flushing dogs. Especially if they are not your dogs and you are not totally familiar with their body language. Over good pointing dogs is another matter.

Just my humble opinion.

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Browning Citori, 26"
Browning Sweet 16
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Aurelio Corso
PostPosted: Fri Jan 22, 2021 8:13 am  Reply with quote



Joined: 08 May 2018
Posts: 73

Your correct it would be easier with a hammer less but I really enjoy the light weight and sling on the old Sauer.I have found that carrying the gun vertical and the heel of the stock close to my thigh for leverage with my thumb across both hammers I am just a little slower but I am still looking for a hammer less with some cast off.
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fourtown
PostPosted: Fri Jan 22, 2021 8:36 am  Reply with quote



Joined: 25 Jan 2014
Posts: 137
Location: MN

They only "hammer" gun I have hunted birds with is my grandfathers 110 year old 16 single shot that I still have and shoot occasionally. So I am commenting as an outsider
in the world of double hammer guns.

One option would be to only load one shell. Then there is only one hammer to cock on the flush.
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Bill K
PostPosted: Fri Jan 22, 2021 8:16 pm  Reply with quote



Joined: 13 Oct 2014
Posts: 196
Location: North Shore of Boston

We hunt upland birds over pointers, and frown upon friends who want to hunt over our dogs with hammer guns.

I can’t conceive of hunting upland over flushers with hammer guns.

All things considered we find it disconcerting, and if it wasn’t for our dogs these friends wouldn’t hunt - so it’s our dogs and our call.

I have a hammer gun that I confine to an occasional round of skeet, and even in controlled circumstances I consider hammer guns to ‘complicate’ the ‘firing solution’.

Not looking to upset anyone, but when it comes to upland hunting there’s too much going on to have ‘loose cannons’ in our midst and at close proximity.

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North of Boston
Browning New A5 Sweet Sixteen circa 2019
Browning Citori Upland 16 GA circa 2013
Browning Sweet Sixteen 16 GA circa 1957
Savage Fox Sterlingworth 16 GA circa 1934
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tramroad28
PostPosted: Sat Jan 23, 2021 8:09 am  Reply with quote



Joined: 20 Jul 2011
Posts: 613
Location: Ohio..where ruffed grouse were

Can't help the OP, as hammerguns have all the interest of an empty fish tank, for me.

However, since all hammerguns, all hammergun shooters, all hammergun hunters, all hammergun field scenarios are far from equal...let alone the differences found in flusher training, hup and other ...hard to imagine generalizing a No Hammergun Allowed attitude.

If tho, I ever saw even the slightest slip, be it with a hammergun or not, be it unavoidable or not, my dogs would be leashed and re-kenneled.
Desired use of any shotgun by anyone is of zero importance re a birddog.
I suspect that most hammergun shooters and hammergun hunters feel the same way.
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cowdoc87
PostPosted: Tue Jan 26, 2021 7:18 pm  Reply with quote
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Joined: 20 Jun 2006
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Location: Kelso, Tennessee

tramroad28 wrote:
Can't help the OP, as hammerguns have all the interest of an empty fish tank, for me.

However, since all hammerguns, all hammergun shooters, all hammergun hunters, all hammergun field scenarios are far from equal...let alone the differences found in flusher training, hup and other ...hard to imagine generalizing a No Hammergun Allowed attitude.

If tho, I ever saw even the slightest slip, be it with a hammergun or not, be it unavoidable or not, my dogs would be leashed and re-kenneled.
Desired use of any shotgun by anyone is of zero importance re a birddog.
I suspect that most hammergun shooters and hammergun hunters feel the same way.

“Even the slightest slip” is what keeps dog owners and old hunters awake at night. When I was about 10, I was lucky enough to see a friend of my father’s cry recalling a gun accident while hunting. It certainly etched indelibly in my little mind the importance of gun safety. Not putting down the hammer gun at all. Just be damn sure you’re safe.

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Bill K
PostPosted: Wed Jan 27, 2021 8:21 am  Reply with quote



Joined: 13 Oct 2014
Posts: 196
Location: North Shore of Boston

I feel motivated to add to my earlier comment of using hammer guns in the field -

Hammer guns are definitely cool, but they undoubtedly add complexity to the 'firing solution (i. e. the amalgamation of all contributors getting a gun into 'battery' (safe, ready to shoot, and on target)).

Upland hunting is essential a 'gun fight', the action is fast & furious with a good measure of the unexpected mixed in - even when your dog's nose is literally within inches of the bird.

BTW our dogs are exalted family members. I've got the price of a used car tied up in them, everybody (both family & friends) know that their primary purpose is bird hunting - and the joke is, in the off season, we refer to them as "44 weeks off with pay".

And yes we love them as pets.

A lot of hunters do not not know, or understand, hunting over a trained field dog etiquette. I had one clown (not a part of our hunting party) who shot a bird flushed up over my dog, then got into a tussle with my dog over it and had the stupidity to say "shoot that dog". In a split second I leveled my gun, snapped off the safety (which deafened the area) and I said 'I'll shoot you". Everybody froze, the air got really static, and extremely polite diplomacy was overtured to me.

I saw one hunter who got shot in the face by another hunter who was swinging on a low flying bird at under 20 yards - the same shooter wounded at least one other hunter in his 'pray & spray' moment. I also saw somebody shoot my son's friend in the ankle with a stray pellet.

I also saw a hunter who shot his own dog in the back of the head (the dog had just flushed a bird) - amazingly the dog survived.

And the scariest situation of all is hunting quail - best described as hunting giant bumblebees, as they corkscrew around - sometimes flying in your face. You have to know and trust your hunting companions - as sure as hell you're going to wind up looking down the bore of one of their guns. If you recall VP Cheney shooting one of his hunting party a number of years back, if you ever hunted quail you'd understand completely.

So my recommendation is, unless you are working with a hunting party who are totally comfortable with hammer guns - is to please leave it home.

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Bill K
North of Boston
Browning New A5 Sweet Sixteen circa 2019
Browning Citori Upland 16 GA circa 2013
Browning Sweet Sixteen 16 GA circa 1957
Savage Fox Sterlingworth 16 GA circa 1934
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Pine Creek/Dave
PostPosted: Wed Jan 27, 2021 11:16 am  Reply with quote



Joined: 17 Mar 2017
Posts: 1818
Location: Endless Mountains of Pa

Gentlemen,

We hunt Grouse over our pointing dogs with a Hammer Gun quite often, we have been taught the proper way to due it, making everything and everyone safe. We do not tolerate unsafe gun handling from anybody hunting with us. The rules are explained prior to ever entering the woods, this happens both at home, in the vehicle and then again just before we enter the forest with our dogs.

When sportsman are educated properly a Hammer Gun is just as safe as any other shotgun. Our family has been using them with our dogs sense they were invented and sold to the hunting public. In fact I just recently picked up another antique 16 gauge Crescent Hammer Gun and have successfully taken both Grouse and Woodcock with it safely. It's the sportsman handling the gun that is important, like any other tool, proper handling is required.

Pine Creek/Dave
L.C. Smith Man

One of my favorite Hammer Guns is a 1900, 20 Gauge H&R Grouse gun.


Recently acquired antique 16 gauge Crescent Hammer Gun that works great with RST & Poly SpredR's. It's a bird killer for sure.


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