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<  16ga. Guns  ~  28 GAUGE BROWNING CITORI SUPERLIGHT FEATHER O/U
Dannyboy175
PostPosted: Fri Mar 10, 2017 7:37 pm  Reply with quote



Joined: 16 Mar 2013
Posts: 93
Location: York, PA

Are questions about 28 gauges allowed here? Please let me know if this is not allowed or even just frowned upon.

I love the 16 gauge, but am not above shooting other gauges from time to time. My favorite hunting gun is actually a 20 gauge Browning Citori Superlite Feather. I bought a Superlite Feather in 16 gauge a couple of months ago, and it's been my go to gun for pheasant. I'm thinking about rounding out the complete set with a 12 gauge and a 28 gauge, but am not sure about the 28. It's built on a 20 gauge frame, which means that it may be heavier than the 20 gauge.... I've seen two weights that are actually a pound different (5 lb 11 oz and 6 lb 12 oz).

Has anyone owned, handled, hunted with a Citori Superlite Feather in 28 gauge? Is it a nimble and light as the 20 or 16 gauge versions? Are there other light weight 28 gauge O/U or SxS guns that you recommend over the Citori Superlite Feather for the same ballpark ($2000)? I have a preference for single triggers and straight stock, so this limits my options.

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Browning A5 Sweet Sixteen
Browning Citori Upland Special 16 ga.
Browning Citori Superlite Feather 16 ga.
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byrdog
PostPosted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 2:13 am  Reply with quote
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I just ordered a 28ga SXS from Dickinson. This gun will have #3 grade fancey walnut stock with a semi pistol grip shnable forend and 24" barrels.Weighs 5lbs 4 os. So this is a made to order gun for $2345.00 shipped. you can get straight stocks and single trigs in an O/U if that is what you like. I have a 16ga 26" SXS called an Estate that is just marvelous. I think these guns are a hell of a good value.

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Dannyboy175
PostPosted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 5:58 am  Reply with quote



Joined: 16 Mar 2013
Posts: 93
Location: York, PA

byrdog wrote:
I just ordered a 28ga SXS from Dickinson. This gun will have #3 grade fancey walnut stock with a semi pistol grip shnable forend and 24" barrels.Weighs 5lbs 4 os. So this is a made to order gun for $2345.00 shipped. you can get straight stocks and single trigs in an O/U if that is what you like. I have a 16ga 26" SXS called an Estate that is just marvelous. I think these guns are a hell of a good value.

I've noticed the Dickinson guns at my local Cabelas, when I'm doing my ritual lap through the gun library. I've never asked to handle one, however. I like the weight that you quote, however, and the ability to pick the features I want is great. Do they offer a choice of chokes?

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Browning A5 Sweet Sixteen
Browning Citori Upland Special 16 ga.
Browning Citori Superlite Feather 16 ga.
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byrdog
PostPosted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 7:21 am  Reply with quote
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Location: the Moosehorn

Fixed OR tubes your choice

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If you take Cranberries and stew them like applesauce they taste much more like Prunes than Rhubarb does ----G.M/
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16gaugeguy
PostPosted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 2:32 pm  Reply with quote
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Joined: 12 Mar 2005
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Location: massachusetts

Dannyboy175 wrote:
"...but (I) am not sure about the 28. It's built on a 20 gauge frame, which means that it may be heavier than the 20 gauge.... I've seen two weights that are actually a pound different (5 lb 11 oz and 6 lb 12 oz)."


When it comes to 20, 28, and .410 sub-bore Citori models, the receiver and barrel blocks have the same dimensions in all three. The only differences are in chamber sizes (which affects the weights) and the different gauge barrel weights.

The 16 ga sub-bore barrel blocks are slightly wider by .100". So the receiver blocks are also widened by the same dimension (.050" per side = .100") to allow for the wider barrel blocks needed to accommodate the 16 gauge chambers. All other dimensions are the same as the receiver blocks of other sub-bore models.

Some individual 16 ga models weigh slightly less than the average weight standard Invector Choke 20 gauge models. The receiver blocks and barrel assemblies are not that much different in weight. The weight of the wood is probably the biggest factor at work here. The 20 gauge Invector Plus models are heavier on average than both the standard Invector Choke 20 and 16 gauge models, because their barrel assemblies are heavier.

I believe but am not certain the feather model sub-bore barrel blocks are steel. The receiver blocks are alloy. The combined weight of the barrels and barrel blocks is where the biggest difference in weight will be found.

Hope this info helps you to figure it out, but perhaps it's best to ask Browning C/S about this. They have an 800 number and an email address. They should have the answer for you. Good luck.
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Dannyboy175
PostPosted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 6:03 pm  Reply with quote



Joined: 16 Mar 2013
Posts: 93
Location: York, PA

16gaugeguy wrote:
Dannyboy175 wrote:
"...but (I) am not sure about the 28. It's built on a 20 gauge frame, which means that it may be heavier than the 20 gauge.... I've seen two weights that are actually a pound different (5 lb 11 oz and 6 lb 12 oz)."


When it comes to 20, 28, and .410 sub-bore Citori models, the receiver and barrel blocks have the same dimensions in all three. The only differences are in chamber sizes (which affects the weights) and the different gauge barrel weights.

The 16 ga sub-bore barrel blocks are slightly wider by .100". So the receiver blocks are also widened by the same dimension (.050" per side = .100") to allow for the wider barrel blocks needed to accommodate the 16 gauge chambers. All other dimensions are the same as the receiver blocks of other sub-bore models.

Some individual 16 ga models weigh slightly less than the average weight standard Invector Choke 20 gauge models. The receiver blocks and barrel assemblies are not that much different in weight. The weight of the wood is probably the biggest factor at work here. The 20 gauge Invector Plus models are heavier on average than both the standard Invector Choke 20 and 16 gauge models, because their barrel assemblies are heavier.

I believe but am not certain the feather model sub-bore barrel blocks are steel. The receiver blocks are alloy. The combined weight of the barrels and barrel blocks is where the biggest difference in weight will be found.

Hope this info helps you to figure it out, but perhaps it's best to ask Browning C/S about this. They have an 800 number and an email address. They should have the answer for you. Good luck.


This is a superlite feather. They have aluminum receivers... the sizing is probably relatively transferable, regardless of the material. Thanks.

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Browning A5 Sweet Sixteen
Browning Citori Upland Special 16 ga.
Browning Citori Superlite Feather 16 ga.
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WyoChukar
PostPosted: Wed Mar 15, 2017 11:12 am  Reply with quote



Joined: 16 Jul 2015
Posts: 601
Location: Hudson,Wy

Generally speaking Beretta guns are lighter an livelier guns than similar Brownings and can be had in similar price ranges. Check one out. My take is that the Berettas are much nicer to carry on long days hunting upland birds and Brownings have a nice solid swing for waterfowl and clays.

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Two Pipe Shoot
PostPosted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 12:50 pm  Reply with quote
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When I started shooting mostly small gauge guns I went with the Berettas over the Brownings because for me a shotgun has to have field utility and the worst cased scenario is a day's walk behind a stout dog. Berettas are light and lively and forgive me for saying, but a Browning swings like a lightered knot/ fence post in comparison. Combine that with their heavier weight and they don't work for me. Heavy guns are for dove stools and duck blinds and clay ranges and young stout gunners who spent their summers tossing hay bales onto the bed of a moving truck, dried hay stuck in every wet crevice and itching with little time to scratch.

Reno

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Square Load
PostPosted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 2:41 pm  Reply with quote
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Have never touched a Superlite Feather in 28ga but I once owned a 28ga. Citori and it was heavier than my 16ga Citori so I sold it. The barrels have a bunch of metal in them near the receiver and I would guess that the 28ga. Feather has the same set of barrels as the regular Citori.

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Current 16ga. Stable

Browning Citori Gr I
Browning Sweet 16
Remington 11-48
Remington 31
Remington 870
Ugartechea Gr II
Winchester Mod 12
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df
PostPosted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 3:48 pm  Reply with quote



Joined: 01 Oct 2007
Posts: 316
Location: minneapolis

I had and sold a Citori grade VII in 28 ga. It was not a superlight or feather. It was a very good gun. However it was a bit heavy and bulky as Citori 28 Ga guns are built on a 20 ga frame.
I now own a baby frame Beretta 28 ga SP and like it a lot better.
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hoashooter
PostPosted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 7:45 pm  Reply with quote
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Nimble and light are relative to the shooter---Two Pipe hit it on head---I had a 28 ga for several years everything from skeet to rabbits.Only reason I sold it was another shooter liked it too much ($)--
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16'er
PostPosted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 8:57 pm  Reply with quote
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Location: Tappahannock, Virginia

Buy or load 3/4oz moderate velocity loads for your 20ga superlight.

I'm setting up a new shooter right now, and after an exhaustive search for a solution, I've settled on this approach. If I could have found a single trigger pistol grip 16ga O/U in the 5.5lb range it would have been an easy choice.

Alas, I have a franchi 20ga SL on order and will be buying either the Winchester or Fiocchi reduced recoil 20ga offerings. At least untill we see what volume of shells will be required. Then a new loader might be in order. The factory loaded 3/4oz 20ga shells are comparable in price to 16 and 28ga standard shells in cost.
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16gaugeguy
PostPosted: Thu May 04, 2017 5:04 pm  Reply with quote
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Why not load some 3/4 oz. 16 gauge loads. These little poppers are why I put my 28 ga hunting models away. When it comes to hunting loads, anything the 28 can do, the 16 will do better based on my own results w/ both 28 ga. and 16 ga. 3/4 ounce loads. Same goes for the 20 ga. as well. The 16 is just better in my experience, so I'll use what works best for me.

As far as hunting gun weights are concerned, light and lively is relative to each shooter based on his results. Any gun which weighs less than 6.2 lbs. is a bit too light and lively in my hands. I need at least 6.2 pounds or more between my hands, or my normally smooth move, mount, swing, shoot sequence goes right out the window. 6.5 to 7 lbs. is ideal in my experience.

I've never used to get too weary to tote a 7 lb gun and shoot well for several hours or more either. I used to tote my 16 ga. Citori all day behind my Heidi dog. We didn't miss very often either.

I'm older now and can't do that kind of mileage anymore, but that doesn't mean an extra light weight gun is going to make the difference. I'd be kidding myself if I thought it would.

So now, I hunt slower and don't put in more than a couple of hours. This way, my 6.8 lb. Citori still suits me very well, and I'll hit the mark when the bird goes up. That's important at my age. I just don't get as many shots now, so I'm not going to waste them by trying to shoot with a gun which does not handle well for me.

Just how it is for me. What works for anyone else is up to them. I'm not about to tell them what will work for them or even suggest it. Experience is the best teacher here.
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cowdoc87
PostPosted: Thu May 04, 2017 6:56 pm  Reply with quote
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Joined: 20 Jun 2006
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Location: Kelso, Tennessee

Ruger Red label 28's are pretty sweet. Might be hard to find one in a straight stock, though.

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Ray-citori
PostPosted: Fri May 05, 2017 6:12 am  Reply with quote



Joined: 05 Feb 2015
Posts: 175
Location: New Braunfels TX

Here you go on the Ruger
http://www.gunbroker.com/item/642708195
http://www.gunbroker.com/item/643162173
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