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Two Barrels
PostPosted: Sun Sep 10, 2017 10:37 am  Reply with quote



Joined: 11 Dec 2015
Posts: 43
Location: Upstate, SC

I am looking to purchase a 16 ga Model 12 and have very limited experience with Model 12s in general. Aside from the early 2-9/16" chambered guns, are there really any big things to be on the lookout for specific to Model 12s when evaluating these guns?

I am in the market for a shooter, not a collectable. Primary use will be casual five stand, on the dove field and the occassional wood duck (using bismuth).

Scott
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67galaxie
PostPosted: Sun Sep 10, 2017 10:48 am  Reply with quote



Joined: 16 Mar 2017
Posts: 144
Location: Valdosta GA

I really love mine. They carry great and you can use them from squirrels and rabbits to quail, ducks and turkeys. Turkey's really hate them
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Dave In AZ
PostPosted: Sun Sep 10, 2017 1:11 pm  Reply with quote



Joined: 13 Oct 2015
Posts: 185

I have a 1935 one, Mod choke, love it-- used it for 20 years or so as my main gun. I would go IC or mod on the choke if able.

I will say that the ejection port is quite tight on the Mod 12, not much extra room at all, and some hulls that are just 1/32" longer than others have issues ejecting. I made a post on it somewhere here, can't remember off the top of my head what brand was "too long", but just realize it can happen and it's not the gun.
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jswanson
PostPosted: Sun Sep 10, 2017 4:03 pm  Reply with quote



Joined: 03 Feb 2008
Posts: 692
Location: Adirondak Mtns

The early model of 1912 were 2 1/2 " chamber. Model of 1912 were the first two years I believe so after 1914 should be mod 12 not model of 1912 and may be 2 9/16 " chambers. Model of 1912 are 2 1/2". Joe

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Interested in older US made SxS and upland hunting. New to reloading shot shells and looking for info and advice.
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Flues16
PostPosted: Sun Sep 10, 2017 5:00 pm  Reply with quote
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Joined: 07 Jan 2013
Posts: 333
Location: Virginia

Sometime around 1919 and serial number 200000 the Winchester stopped marking the gun as the Model 1912 and began marking it simply as the Model 12. But the chamber lengths remained 2 9/16" for the 16 gauge and 2 1/2" for the 20 gauge.

Later, in about 1927 (at approximately serial number 462761), the chambers on the 16 and 20 gauge Model 12s were lengthened to 2 3/4". Many other gun makers didn't change to 2 3/4" chambers for the 16 gauge until the 1930s.

But back to the OP's question, you really can't go wrong with a Model 12 if you find one in good condition. Like all guns that are 50+ years old, the main thing I would be sure to check closely is the condition of the wood - look for hairline cracks or splits in the stock and forend. Good stock work is expensive, but most mechanical problems are easier to correct and many parts are still available. That said, the Model 12 has a good reputation for durability and a well-maintained gun shouldn't have many problems.

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John Singer
PostPosted: Sun Sep 10, 2017 5:39 pm  Reply with quote



Joined: 03 Sep 2014
Posts: 125
Location: Brooklyn, MI

Push the loading gate from the bottom up until it contacts the bolt from beneath. Push hard and look for any movement of the bolt. Ideally there should be none. If it moves some, use that as a price point if you really want the gun or look for another one.

If the barrel is loose, here is how to adjust it:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ANwA_bwB5eQ

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byrdog
PostPosted: Mon Sep 11, 2017 8:52 am  Reply with quote
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Joined: 22 Aug 2011
Posts: 1368
Location: the Moosehorn

I have had 2 model12 16ga guns where the bolt release spring had become a little rusty and the wire spring snapped had to replace the whole bolt release as the springs are staked to to it and seems to require a special tool to repair. New parts were more than $100.00 to get a $300.00 gun working again.

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If you take Cranberries and stew them like applesauce they taste much more like Prunes than Rhubarb does ----G.M/
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16gaugeguy
PostPosted: Thu Sep 14, 2017 11:24 am  Reply with quote
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Joined: 12 Mar 2005
Posts: 6530
Location: massachusetts

Two Barrels wrote:
I am looking to purchase a 16 ga Model 12 and have very limited experience with Model 12s in general. Aside from the early 2-9/16" chambered guns, are there really any big things to be on the lookout for specific to Model 12s when evaluating these guns?

I am in the market for a shooter, not a collectable. Primary use will be casual five stand, on the dove field and the occassional wood duck (using bismuth).

Scott


Best look for a clean, dependable 16 gauge Model 12 w/o any mechanical problems, or severely worn or rusted parts. Be advised. You will pay dearly for a clean, problem free Model 12, but you won't be buying any previous owner's problems due to his neglect and carelessness.

Best remember, the 16 gauge Model 12 repeaters have been out of production for well over a half century. The ones made were very popular among hunters. Most of them have been heavily used and all too often put away uncleaned and wet. Usable Model 12 replacement parts are scarce, hard to find in good condition, and very expensive when you do find them. Well performed repair service is also expensive if you want the work done right.

My best advise is buy one of the better modern 16 ga repeaters for now, and then spend the time necessary to find a good clean Model 12. The search will most likely be a long one (unless you get real lucky real soon), so having a modern pump gun on hand to shoot and hunt with will help keep you from getting impatient and way too froggy (it's good advise for anyone in the market for a classic 16 gauge repeater). Good luck w/ your search.
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waggo71
PostPosted: Sun Sep 24, 2017 6:12 pm  Reply with quote
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Joined: 31 Dec 2010
Posts: 153
Location: SE Michigan

A later iteration of this venerable shotgun would make a fine shooter, no need to concern yourself with short shells and they are readily available. The prewar guns are bringing a premium so I would focus on a postwar version, modified choke and 28" barrel. From the late forties to about 1956 you will get a flat bottom forend, after that and up to the end of production an extended beavertail forend will the norm...either one will work the action without a hitch. I guarantee that once you operate a model 12 you will find yourself wanting another...and another...and another

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Two Barrels
PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2017 1:36 pm  Reply with quote



Joined: 11 Dec 2015
Posts: 43
Location: Upstate, SC

Well, I found the one I have been looking for after several years of searching. I know I made this initial post just a few weeks ago, but I have been considering/looking for the right Model 12 for a while now. Most that I have seen were priced too high for their condition, and I passed. I made the deal for this one last week and picked it up earlier today.

It is a 1929 Nickel Steel version with a factory marked 2-3/4" chamber and 28" modified choked barrel. It is unmolested and in original condition as best as I can tell. I do not have a bore gauge, but the barrel ID measures appx .650" at the muzzle with my calipers. Barrel to receiver fit is tight, bore is mirror bright, and the bolt locks up solid. The stock and forearm are very sound with the original buttplate. The blue is faded to an even 88 year old patina with no rust or pitting. It ejects once fired Herters/Cheddite hulls with authority. The factory stock dimensions are "everyman's" and fit me pretty well.

I like it alot and have not even fired it yet. It will be tested on five stand tomorrow. If all goes well, it will definitely see some time in the field this year.
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Cheyenne08
PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2017 1:57 pm  Reply with quote
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Joined: 09 Dec 2009
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Location: Cheyenne, Wy

Sounds like you got a winner!

Dale

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kgb
PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2017 5:39 pm  Reply with quote
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Joined: 31 Aug 2005
Posts: 922
Location: Nebraska

Sounds like a good one! Two Mod chokes I've measured have had .009" constriction, my current one carries .011" and it's an earlier short-chambered gun. Herters shells don't always eject from my 2 3/4" A5, you should have no problem with any shell! Best of luck with it.

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Bore, n. Shotgun enthusiast's synonym for "gauge" ; everybody else's synonym for "shotgun enthusiast." - Ed Zern
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Hammer bill
PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2017 7:09 pm  Reply with quote



Joined: 09 Feb 2015
Posts: 140

I'm pretty lucky. I have 2 mod. 12's . Both 16's. One is a 2 barrel set. Matching serial #'s. Full & imp.cyl. The other is full that I had since 16 yrs old. I'm 70 now. Seems like yesterday when I took it down from the rack.
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lowgun
PostPosted: Wed Oct 04, 2017 9:05 am  Reply with quote



Joined: 02 Nov 2010
Posts: 35
Location: Maryland

Byrdog, the piano wire springs can be removed and replaced on your dining room table . Buy a few inches of piano wire of the proper size at your local hardware store. Hit the old wire with a file until it breaks loose. Insert a length of new wire in the slot and peen the slot until the new wire is tight. Solder if you don't trust your peening. Cut wire to length and you are ready to go. A dollar in parts and an hour of your own labor.
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byrdog
PostPosted: Wed Oct 04, 2017 9:13 am  Reply with quote
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Joined: 22 Aug 2011
Posts: 1368
Location: the Moosehorn

I tried that and the peening shattered the hardened steel lever the soldering heat took the temper out of the spring wire.

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ALWAYS wear the safety glasses

If you take Cranberries and stew them like applesauce they taste much more like Prunes than Rhubarb does ----G.M/
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