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BarkeyVA
PostPosted: Fri Dec 08, 2017 7:45 pm  Reply with quote
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Location: Williamsburg, VA

Successful day with my nephew (center) and his friend (left) hunting pheasants on private land around Russell, KS with our guide. Shot my Remington 48 in the morning, but with temps in the 60's, I switched to my Marlin Model 90 in the afternoon because it is about a half pound lighter. As usual, I was the only one with a 16 ga. My hunting companions were both carrying 12's.


Picture of our guide with two pointing labs from Last Chance Wings and Labs. Being able to watch the excellent dog work made the day extra special.


I got out to Kansas the day before my nephew and his friend arrived, and I was able to hunt a couple of hours by myself without a dog in a walk-in hunting area north of Russell. This is my first pheasant ever with my Remington Model 48.

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wj jeffery 16
PostPosted: Fri Dec 08, 2017 11:13 pm  Reply with quote
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Joined: 18 Aug 2010
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Location: Ballymoney Northern Ireland

Looks like you all had a great time ,love them blue skies ,snow here yesterday so cold hunt for us this morning❄. Thanks for sharing,Great photos all the best WJ.
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df
PostPosted: Sat Dec 09, 2017 6:41 am  Reply with quote



Joined: 01 Oct 2007
Posts: 339
Location: minneapolis

Great pics
I grew up sw of there 90 miles. And I hunt in Ks multiple times per year.
Nice shot of stone post. Donít see them many places.
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WyoChukar
PostPosted: Sat Dec 09, 2017 8:01 am  Reply with quote



Joined: 16 Jul 2015
Posts: 652
Location: Hudson,Wy

It was snowing when I left Kansas on the night of the 6th. It killed me to keep going, I wanted to stay and hunt the white stuff. Oh well, no shortage of that in Wyoming...but no quail up here!

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PRONGHORNSOUTH
PostPosted: Sat Dec 09, 2017 5:02 pm  Reply with quote



Joined: 30 Dec 2012
Posts: 104
Location: Central Florida

Love that 90!
They are light.
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BarkeyVA
PostPosted: Sat Dec 09, 2017 6:01 pm  Reply with quote
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df wrote:
Great pics
I grew up sw of there 90 miles. And I hunt in Ks multiple times per year.
Nice shot of stone post. Donít see them many places.

That area of north central Kansas is part of "Post Rock Country" and rock post fences are pretty common, at least where we hunted. Google post rock country for information on the history of those rock posts.

I'm told that those rock posts can weigh up to 600 lb!

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Geoff_L
PostPosted: Tue Dec 19, 2017 11:34 am  Reply with quote



Joined: 01 Oct 2016
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Location: Ohio

That is interesting info about the stone posts.

I was in Central Kansas last month and saw many of them. On our last day we were hunting in thick cover around an abandoned farmhouse. The cover was thick and hid a fallen stone post. I tripped over it and went sprawling into a length of downed barbed wire. That wire tore me up good. But at least my Model 1912 was unscathed!. Smile

Stay current on your tetanus shots!
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BarkeyVA
PostPosted: Tue Dec 19, 2017 12:27 pm  Reply with quote
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Bummer! Aside from your fall, how was the hunting?

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df
PostPosted: Tue Dec 19, 2017 5:43 pm  Reply with quote



Joined: 01 Oct 2007
Posts: 339
Location: minneapolis

BarkeyVA wrote:
df wrote:
Great pics
I grew up sw of there 90 miles. And I hunt in Ks multiple times per year.
Nice shot of stone post. Donít see them many places.

That area of north central Kansas is part of "Post Rock Country" and rock post fences are pretty common, at least where we hunted. Google post rock country for information on the history of those rock posts.

I'm told that those rock posts can weigh up to 600 lb!


Yes there are lots of those posts in those parts of Kansas. My great grandfather landed there in 1892 from Germany. His farm is still in our family. There are a few of those posts on that farm. I dealt with a few of them when I was a kid in the 1960s.
Never saw a 600pounder, but I bet they exist.
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BarkeyVA
PostPosted: Tue Dec 19, 2017 5:52 pm  Reply with quote
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Very interesting accounts of how the posts were quarried. I was told that in the winter they would drill holes every few inches, pour water in them and when it froze the rock would crack so that they could lift out the post. More likely they used wedges and other tools. Still, I'll bet those posts weigh several hundred pounds, and all done by hand.

Now I'm told that garden supply businesses sell them for landscaping.

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Pine Creek/Dave
PostPosted: Tue Dec 19, 2017 6:00 pm  Reply with quote



Joined: 17 Mar 2017
Posts: 296
Location: Endless Mountains of Pa

BarkeyVa,

Fantastic time, and yes the dog work make it all worth while!

Pine Creek/Dave

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Dave in Maine
PostPosted: Wed Dec 20, 2017 11:20 am  Reply with quote



Joined: 12 Sep 2010
Posts: 1561
Location: Maine

Fascinating use of rock for fenceposts.

In Eastern PA, one used to find slate fenceposts. They were made from local slate which couldn't be used for roofing shingles, blackboards or pool tables. The pieces of slate were cut about 8-10 inches wide, 4 or 5, or maybe 6, feet long, and a couple inches thick. Then several oblong holes, usually 3, big enough to admit the tapered ends of 2 fence rails, were cut through the "top" end of the post about a foot apart. Wooden fence rails were used at first, replaced with barbed wire later. A bight of wire would be fed through the hole, wrapped around the post and the wire itself, and then on to the next post.

I used to run into those all the time in older fields, usually in the middle of fencerows, all tangled with briers and whatnot. Made crossing from one field to the next, or getting deeper into the cover, even more interesting.

I think they're likely all gone now, another casualty of ripping out the fencerows and all that.

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