16ga.com Forum Index
Author Message
<  16ga. General Discussion  ~  Classic Hunting reads
hayseed
PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2018 6:04 am  Reply with quote



Joined: 14 Feb 2017
Posts: 116

Enjoy the classic outdoor reads. Started with Ruark's "Old Man and the Boy". Some of my favorite authors are Havilah Babcock, Gene Hill and Gordon MacQuarrie.

Lately, after seeing all the grouse hunters on here, I've started reading Burton Spiller. Another great read. Really has me wanting to try to learn how to hunt them. Just wish they were near me.

Any others share the same interest? Always looking for something new.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Cheesy
PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2018 8:37 am  Reply with quote



Joined: 28 Oct 2015
Posts: 33
Location: SWMO

Not as pure hunting, but outdoors conservation, “A Sand County Almanac” by Aldo Leopold was a good read for me 20 years ago in college.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Gil S
PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2018 5:32 pm  Reply with quote
Member
Member


Joined: 04 Mar 2008
Posts: 1736
Location: Lowcountry Ga.

The Tenth Legion by Tom Kelly. A cult classic among turkey hunters. And for best of the short stories, The Great Duck Misunderstanding by Russell Chatham. Gil
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
P. Howard Clayton
PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2018 6:39 pm  Reply with quote



Joined: 13 Jan 2018
Posts: 19
Location: North Georgia

Col. Jim Corbett's - The Temple Tiger, Maneaters of Kumaon, Jungle Lore and others. Fascinating books about his adventures in India in the early part of the 20th century; and, as difficult as they may be to believe, they are all documented events. Not todays field hunting exploits, just enjoyable reading. Still readily available through Amazon and others.
Howard

_________________
1 Samuel 17: 34-37
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
dannypratt
PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2018 7:08 pm  Reply with quote
Member
Member


Joined: 21 Dec 2005
Posts: 530
Location: Napoleon, MI

Man Eaters of Tsavo. By H. Patterson.

As with Corbetts stories, it seems purely ludacris, but it's all perfectly true.


Gordon Maquarry (sp) is a gem, and William H Tapply is just as wonderful.

I believe my most favorite read (and I read it at least once every fall) is Col. Townsend Wheelen's "Red Letter Days in British Columbia". Its got to be the most perfectly described account of an incredible North Woods hunting adventure. And, again, as perfectly true as the sky is blue.

No one writes anything like they did 50 years ago, and I am afraid those days were gone long before I was even born. It's hard to imagine someone who fancies the 16ga that wouldn't engage the classic outdoor adventures.

_________________
Good luck & great hunting,
-Danny Pratt
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Coyote Crusader
PostPosted: Tue Sep 11, 2018 5:53 am  Reply with quote



Joined: 13 Mar 2017
Posts: 43
Location: Nacogdoches Texas

Peter Hathaway Capstick

_________________
16 gauge owner/reloader, NRA Life Member.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
hayseed
PostPosted: Tue Sep 11, 2018 8:15 am  Reply with quote



Joined: 14 Feb 2017
Posts: 116

I have quite a few books by Capstick.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Pine Creek/Dave
PostPosted: Tue Sep 11, 2018 11:26 am  Reply with quote



Joined: 17 Mar 2017
Posts: 545
Location: Endless Mountains of Pa

hayseed,

If you like Spiller you will also like J.A. Knight, pick up his Grouse Book and his Woodcock Book, both exceptional reading.

Pine Creek/Dave
L.C. Smith Man

_________________
"L.C. Smith America's Best" - John Houchins
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Dave In AZ
PostPosted: Tue Sep 11, 2018 1:11 pm  Reply with quote



Joined: 13 Oct 2015
Posts: 255

I love all Gordon McQuarrie's books.

However, I find I mostly dislike Gene Hill's work... he always comes across to me as a pompous aristocrat wannabee, vs. the salt-of-the-earth working man feel I get from McQuarrie. A lot of folks here seem to like his work, but I can't stop picturing Judge Schmells from Caddyshack when I read him.

Nash Buckingham was just unreadable for me--social mores have changes so much since he wrote that I found "De Shootingest Gent'eman" unpalatable, and certainly not witty or humorous.

It's a shame, as there just aren't that many authors out there of similar works. I'll have to try some of the recommendations listed up above.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
tramroad28
PostPosted: Tue Sep 11, 2018 3:05 pm  Reply with quote



Joined: 20 Jul 2011
Posts: 417

............


Last edited by tramroad28 on Tue Sep 11, 2018 3:07 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
tramroad28
PostPosted: Tue Sep 11, 2018 3:05 pm  Reply with quote



Joined: 20 Jul 2011
Posts: 417

..........


Last edited by tramroad28 on Tue Sep 11, 2018 3:07 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
tramroad28
PostPosted: Tue Sep 11, 2018 3:06 pm  Reply with quote



Joined: 20 Jul 2011
Posts: 417

Capstick wrote entertaining stories of the long grass. Very Happy

Ken Roebuck’s ..Where Spaniels Spring...is a great little book.
Jeffrey Cardenas’ ...Marquesas...is a great little book about fishing that area.

One could go on and make a list of a couple hundred folks who put words on a page well describing a life afield...with gun or rod or rifle.

Just a final one tho...Harry Middleton. Nuff said.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
fourtown
PostPosted: Tue Sep 11, 2018 8:27 pm  Reply with quote



Joined: 25 Jan 2014
Posts: 82
Location: MN

What others have said and ...

Gordon Grand was a lawyer and businessman in the first half of the last century. He wrote stories to share with friends and family. I bought a book of his" Old Man" only because it was an original numbered Derrydale first edition. I had no idea what it was about. I picked it up and couldn't put it down. It is a collection of short stories primarily about fox hunting with horses and hounds, of which I knew nothing and had little interest. But his stories touch on may other rural pursuits of the time: horse racing and showing, cock fights, ratting with terriers.

But his stories and characters are incredible. They just suck you in. I searched out and found all of his published work. I just love them all. I tried reading stories from other authors about fox hunting, but they seemed dry and stuffy compared to Grand's work.

As an aside, many original sporting books are dropping in price as so many Boomers are downsizing and liquidating. I bought many sporting books on Ebay from about 2000 to 2007. Now generally these books are selling for 30 to 50% less than when I bought them.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
hayseed
PostPosted: Wed Sep 12, 2018 5:55 pm  Reply with quote



Joined: 14 Feb 2017
Posts: 116

Has anyone read a newer book; Among the Aspen by Mark Parman?

Also likes or dislike of Frank Woolner. Have not read anything of his yet.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
WyoChukar
PostPosted: Wed Sep 12, 2018 9:43 pm  Reply with quote



Joined: 16 Jul 2015
Posts: 1101
Location: Hudson,Wy

I am surprised there is no mention of Archibald Rutledge. What I have read so far is certainly enjoyable.

_________________
Only catch snowflakes on your tongue AFTER the birds fly south for the winter...
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
All times are GMT - 7 Hours

View next topic
View previous topic
Page 1 of 3
Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next
16ga.com Forum Index  ~  16ga. General Discussion

Post new topic   Reply to topic


 
Jump to:  

You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum




Powered by phpBB and NoseBleed v1.09