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<  16ga. Ammunition & Reloading  ~  1oz VS 1 1/8 OZ These days
Barnyard Drake
PostPosted: Tue Sep 19, 2023 9:30 am  Reply with quote



Joined: 21 Jan 2019
Posts: 51
Location: Indiana

If this has been put up for discussion lately, sorry.

With the changes in available components and powder components, which load do you prefer for upland hunting with a 16gauge? With dog and without.

Thanks for the replies.

BD

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Remington 1148 X 2
Ithaca 37 Fthrlt X 2 & Upland
LC Smith Field
Winchester 1200
Fox Sterlingworth
Fox Savage
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Model 12 X 2
I'd rather be using one of them right now.
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IDcut
PostPosted: Tue Sep 19, 2023 3:25 pm  Reply with quote
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Joined: 26 Jun 2005
Posts: 376
Location: North ID.

I like to hunt early season birds i.e. chukar, huns, quail and pheasants with a 1 oz load of #5 or #6 shot and late season pheasants with a 1 1/8 oz load of #5 shot.
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Citori16
PostPosted: Tue Sep 19, 2023 6:18 pm  Reply with quote
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Joined: 19 May 2006
Posts: 340
Location: Too far south in New England

Depends… on the bird, the gun, the hunt, the time of year…

If I had to pick one, it would be 1-1/8… 5, 6 or 7.5 shot

Currently running a lighter gun, so 1 oz to start, with some 1-1/8 for back up, even some “532 grain” because they work well, but stress the gun and my shoulder.

With my normal gun, the 532 grain combo load would be top pick, with 1-1/8 for back up or longer treks.

With my Flues or Crescent for woodcock, 3/4 oz to 7/8

For me, it’s mostly about the pattern…in general: larger shot means higher payload to get the pattern density

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MSM2019
PostPosted: Tue Sep 19, 2023 8:33 pm  Reply with quote



Joined: 04 Mar 2019
Posts: 1870
Location: Central ND

Depends, for Sharptails, Huns, Chickens and Dove I prefer 1 oz. For pheasants I prefer 1 1/8 oz.

That's for lead shot.

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pumpgun
PostPosted: Wed Sep 20, 2023 2:11 pm  Reply with quote
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Joined: 02 Oct 2004
Posts: 426
Location: Maine

I hunt grouse/woodcock over Springers, and use 1 1/8 #7 handholds. Late season grouse I'll switch to 1 1/8 #6
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WyoChukar
PostPosted: Thu Sep 21, 2023 8:37 pm  Reply with quote



Joined: 16 Jul 2015
Posts: 2127
Location: Hudson,Wy

My honest assessment of this is that 1 1/8 oz. provides a small advantage over a 1 oz. load with tight chokes beyond 40 yards. The advantage grows with buffered loads. Unless you are in a situation where long shots are about the only shots offered, you won't notice much difference between 1 and 1 1/8 oz. loads of equal quality.

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Brewster11
PostPosted: Thu Sep 21, 2023 10:38 pm  Reply with quote



Joined: 08 Feb 2009
Posts: 1329
Location: Western WA

Agree with WyoChukar, but for no good reason except looking back, most of the birds I’ve taken were with 1 oz loads. They work just fine.

B.
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MSM2019
PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2023 5:16 am  Reply with quote



Joined: 04 Mar 2019
Posts: 1870
Location: Central ND

Here's my thoughts on payload weight. These are only my opinions based on what I have experienced on wild birds. I use different size payloads for different size pellets. For upland birds, the size of the target that will kill the bird at longer ranges, isn't the size of the birds body. Depending on the bird it ranges from the size of a standard clay target on edge to probably a 60MM (mini) on edge, pheasant on the big side, quail/woodcock on the small side. I am trying to kill the bird with pellets to the nervous system, head, neck, backbone, and hopefully to break a wing or two. In my opinion there are very few presentations of the bird in flight that I don't get at least a peek at that part of the bird. (With the smaller birds I don't think that to be such an absolute for one shot kills.) I believe that I have to have two things to accomplish that, pellet energy and pattern density. So my payloads are 7/8 oz., 1 oz., 1 1/8 oz. and a buffered 1 1/4 oz. load, which keeps the pellet count over 200 in each payload. The pellet sizes are #8 or #7.5, #7, #6 and #5. I haven't triggered a buffered #5 load in a long time, as that is the 3rd load in the shotgun and I don't use it until the season gets late and the weather gets on the mean side.

I am not trying to sway anyone, nor am I saying that anyone is doing anything wrong, the above ideas and thoughts are strictly my opinion on payload weight for the 16 gauge.

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